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Resetting the Table - A Peoples Food Policy in Canada

Written by the Peoples Food Policy Project - Indigenous Circle of activists and scholars from across Canada.

Identifies main challenges and ways forward - outlining key recommendations for forming federal policies as it relates to reconciling Indigenous land, food and cultural values within the food sovereignty movement in Canada.

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The following file is a 1623 KB pdf document you many need to download Adobe Reader to open the file.

Indigenous Peoples' Biocultural Climate Change Assessment Initiative

The United Nations Permanent Forum at its Seventh Session of the Permanent Forum held from 21 April to 2 May 2008 recommended that "...the United Nations University – Institute of Advanced Studies, university research centres and relevant United Nations agencies conduct further studies on the impacts of climate change and climate change responses on indigenous peoples who are living in highly fragile ecosystems".

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The following file is a 101 KB pdf document you many need to download Adobe Reader to open the file.

Citation / Reference: 
United Nations University - Informing International Policy on Traditional Knowledge

Culture, Colonization and Policy Making: Issues in Native American Health

To improve health care, education, and prevention, a larger cultural and historical contextual framework is needed which pays heed to the impact of colonization and its effects on Native peoples. Such a holistic framework evaluates the long-term impact of introduced diseases and the cultural trauma caused by the removal of Indians to reservations (Jaimes 1992), the boarding school era (Johansen 2000), and the forced sterilizations of Native women (Carpio 1995; Torpy 1998).

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The following file is a 458 KB pdf document you many need to download Adobe Reader to open the file.

Citation / Reference: 
Olsen, B. (2002). Culture, Colonization and Policy Making: Issues in Native American Health. Paper presentation for the Symposium on Politics of Race, Culture and Health

Asserting Tribal Sovereignty over Cultural Property: Moving Towards Protection of Genetic Material and Indigenous Knowledge

The purpose of this article is to provide, to tribes faced with an era of genetic research, some guidance about how to establish strong protections over their genetic material and Indigenous knowledge. The first section will discuss why genetic material should be protected as cultural property and will briefly examine why tribes need to be concerned about research involving genetic material and Indigenous knowledge, with a particular focus on human genetic research. The second section will examine a variety of examples of human genetic research on Indigenous peoples.

Citation / Reference: 
Harry, D., Kanehe, L. (2006). Asserting Tribal Sovereignty Over Cultural Property: Moving Towards Protection of Genetic Material and Indigenous Knowledge in Seattle Journal for Social Justice - Indigenous Land and Property Rights. 5 Seattle J. for Social Justice 27